Google

83.41% of statistics are pulled out of thin air.

And sometimes I do not trust those lie, damn lies and statistics. I prefer to go on my gut instinct.

Even so, sometimes it is reassuring to see that gut instincts are backed up by evidence from trustworthy research organisations.

Google evokes some strong gut reactions in most of us, and some recent research might serve to confirm what we all suspect to be true. Here are some of my assumptions:

Assumption 1: Rich People use Google, Poor People use Yahoo

I thought that assumption might get your attention. The Great Google Class Divide.

Hitwise have published a review of “audience strengths” comparing the Google-Using population to the General-Online population. Using the benchmark of the propensity of searchers to spend $500 online, Hitwise, found the richer you are, the more likely you are to use Google.

The top left corner shows the high users of Yahoo, and bottom right are the Google users:

Assumption 2: We only look at the first few results in Google, and if we don’t find what we want, we change our search

JupiterResearch have conducted an interesting study into our searching behaviour.

The vast majority of us (68%) only look at one page of Google results, with a ruthless 27% only looking at the first few results. Nearly a fifth of us browsed through more than 3 pages of results in 2002, but that has fallen now to just 8%.


Assumption 3: None of us use those little Menus at the top of Google

Images, Maps, Shopping: those little menu choices at the top of Google are used for “Vertical Searching.” Research commissioned by iProspect shows most of us don’t use them, we just type straight into the Google search box, with only about a quarter of us dipping our toe into the Google Images search.


It is all Google food for thought!


0 responses to “Google Stereotypes: what we all suspect about Google”

  1. Hazel Edmunds says:

    Interesting idea there — the richer you are the more likely it is that you will use Google and not Yahoo!

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